Month: June 2021

Trabasack Curve with Instructions

Trabasack Curve Review

I have been given a Trabasack Curve to review. Whilst this product was sent to me free I have been using these products for many years and have brought several. This review contains my honest opinions and experiences of the product.

What is a Trabasack?

A Trabasack is a bag and a lap tray all in one. It is a versatile product that has many uses. My main use is as a removable tray but it can also be used as a bag and for storage.

The Trabasack was invented by Clare as a lap tray for her son Joe who uses a wheelchair. The tray had to be safe and practical to use. There are now three main models of the Trabasack. The Max, Mini and Curve. The Mini and Curve Trabasack models come with or without a ‘connect’ surface. The Connect models are made with soft velcro material on the tray portion of the Trabasack Curve. This is useful if you want to velcro items so that they stay put on the tray. For this review, I was given the option to receive a Curve model with or without this feature.

Curve Connect or Curve?

I chose the Curve model without the Connect feature for the purpose of this review. I’ve learnt from experience that the ability to wipe the product clean is important to me, not because I’m particularly messy but because I have a dog! As my main use for this product is to eat and drink and having owned a Curve Connect for seven years prior to receiving this review unit. I know that dog hair and crumbs in particular stick to this tray like glue! Connect is a lovely feature that is doing what it is designed to do but it is not particularly hygienic for food if you have a pet that moults!

The Connect versions are great for anything and everything you want to stay in place which I will be reviewing next week.

Trabasack Curve with Instructions

Using the Trabasack Curve

The Curve comes with an instruction leaflet and two straps, one short one long. Which strap/s you use depends on how you want to use the product. As I’m always in my wheelchair I prefer to use one strap around my waist. This keeps the curve as close to me as possible and is the most stable. Due to my disability, I cannot reach around my back so if I’m by myself I connect the two straps together and wrap them around my armrests at the front. This position isn’t as good but at least I can secure it independently. The Trabasack can also be worn like a standard rucksack and slung over one shoulder. It may have been created for disabled people but it makes a really great laptop or tablet bag whether you have a disability or not.

Curve on Lap

D-Rings and ring pull zips

The Trabasack has six D-Rings to which the straps attach. These are strong and sturdy as well as being easy and simple to use. Instead of fiddling about opening the hook and then struggling to attach it to the ring, simply press the hook end of a strap against a D-Ring. The hook will be pushed open and snap onto the D-Ring.

Curve strap hook and D-Ring

The zip runs all the way around the product and the zips are fitted with ring pulls so that the zips are easier to use. Instead of having to grip a tiny object, simply place a finger or thumb in the ring and move your hand to the side to open or close the zip. I keep the zips together as I like the way it looks and I have no trouble gripping them but if you want to make it easier to open and close always have one zip at the front of the curve. That way you only have to pull one zip instead of two to open or close the bag.

Trabasack Ring Pull Zips

Trabasack Curve Tray

The tray portion of the product is not only wipe-clean but also non slip. If, like me, you want the wipe-clean Curve the company does sell a non-slip mat, cut to the same shape as the Curve. This can be very useful and can be kept inside the Curve when it is not needed. I have used one before and keep it handy but for day to day, I find the original non-slip surface good enough for my needs.

The tray portion also has quite a high lip/edge on it to stop items from sliding off. I have to say this is why I brought a Trabasack Curve in the first place. I saw a photo of somebody in a wheelchair, using a Trabasack Curve to carry a plate that contained an English breakfast. This may not sound impressive but the plate included baked beans, the person’s lap wasn’t level and the plate and more importantly ALL the food was on the tray!

english-breakfast

Curve Tray Bean Bag

The reason the breakfast didn’t end up on the floor wasn’t just due to the built-in edge around the tray and the straps. The Curve also has a removable bean bag inside it to help keep it level. If you spend a few seconds setting it up on your lap then it really is very stable. I have leg spasms so this isn’t just empty praise. Before I came across the Trabasack Curve I couldn’t use a tray at all as food simply slid off my lap!

Curve Beanbag

Eating with the Trabasack Curve

Eating outside and using unsuitable tables when out is possible with a Trabasack Curve. Unless I have a lunch box I do prefer to rest the front edge of my Trabasack on a table as then I don’t have to bend to my lap to eat, (my knees make it very low!) Prior to having a Curve when eating out, I had to lean forward as my wheelchair wouldn’t fit underneath restaurant tables. In fact, when we went out for a family meal two weeks ago I forgot that my Curve had been taken off the back of my wheelchair. I then had no choice but to lean forward. Doable but a lot less comfortable.

Dinner Plate on Trabasack

Trabasack Curve and iPad

Weather permitting, I like to sit outside and write, watch films etc so I love my iPad. I love my iPad on my Trabasack Curve even more as I’m not restricted to sitting where tables are.

Another big plus is when I have finished using my iPad I can place my iPad inside my Curve. It is nice and safe on my lap. I am now hands-free and don’t have to worry about people possibly stealing my property from my wheelchair. With my original Curve Connect, I put velcro on my iPad case and stuck my iPad to the tray, giving me even more peace of mind. I actually ruined an iPad case doing this. Trust me when I tell you a little goes a long way! I put plenty of velcro on the case and it worked too well! I had to remove the iPad from the case to get it off my Trabasack!

Storing items inside Trabasack Curve

I wish this bag had been around when I was at school. A laptop up to 14” can fit inside the Trabasack. It wouldn’t have replaced my school bag, too many books but I could’ve kept my personal belongings on my lap. This is what I do now. I find my laptop too heavy on my legs to use with the Curve but many people do. The Trabasack Curve is a fantastic bag for electronics whether you have a disability or not. The padded inside ensures devices are protected.

Price and conclusion

The Trabasack Curve costs £39.95. The Connect version is slightly more, £44.95. I thought this was expensive for a tray and expensive for a bag. I brought my first one telling myself I was ridiculous for spending so much money. This review Curve is my 5th Trabasack. This isn’t because they are not long-lasting. My oldest one has just broken after seven years. The thread holding one of the D-Rings together has broken and years of using it outside mean it’s sun-bleached. It is still perfectly usable. I wanted to have more so I could keep one in the car and on the back of my wheelchair.

If you struggle to eat at standard tables or without a tray. Perhaps you need a flat surface to lean on to read. Maybe, like me, you want a portable table for your electronics. You won’t be disappointed.

If you have or know a child that needs toys etc within easy reach this will facilitate that. A big plus for me is that it’s also more portable and aesthetically pleasing than the trays that Wheelchair Services provide to their clients.

Look out for my review of the Trabasack Mini Connect where I will be adding Velcro to my iPad case, just in a much smaller amount than before!

A period of adjustments

A lot has happened since I last posted. I stayed in, got somewhat comfortable on zoom and start to accept the way things are. Then the world starts to open up again. I’m not complaining far from it! A lot of little and not so little adjustments are needed to get used to going out again. The whole world is in the same boat. This post is all about the changes that are happening and the adjustments I’m making to get used to my new normal.

Adjusting to wearing a mask

Unless you’re exempt for medical reasons we’ve all had to get used to wearing masks. It’s only now that I’m actually leaving the house that I’m using one. As I also wear glasses. This is extra tricky as the steam meant I could barely see where I was going and sometimes had to remove my glasses for safety. Not very practical as my glasses are as necessary as a mask and thankfully a lot more comfortable!

I received a tip from one of the carers belonging to the agency that assists me. Cross the straps that go behind your ears. This was said very matter of factly. The person assisting me to shower was wearing a mask, gloves and apron in a steamed-up bathroom but her glasses were clear! Having tried various methods suggested by the internet, the next time I ventured out I tried it and to my surprise, it actually works!

Do you like my fashionable life jacket?

Reintroducing myself to eating out

My first meal outside my house since February 2020 happened on the 19th of May 2021. As eating out was an activity my friends and I did at least once a month, it was weird to feel so nervous and not know what to expect, especially as I booked a place we used to visit all the time.

Armed with masks and sensitiser we all turned up. I was twenty minutes late as I realised ten minutes after leaving home that I’d left my handbag behind! Prior to this, the only outings I’d been on were walks to the park or around the block. I hadn’t picked up my handbag in over a year! Madness in itself! Successfully checked into the pub via the track and trace app I cautiously removed my mask. It felt lovely and strange to sit close to people who weren’t my immediate family. I felt like I hadn’t seen my friends in years and also as if I saw them last week and COVID-19 was just a bad dream. Regardless, it felt amazing to catch up!

Menu adjustment perk

Restaurants, pubs cafes etc now have their menus accessible via apps on smartphones. This is so that staff and customers can have less contact and to discourage people from moving around. The pub we were at was offering table service as well but they also had an app which could be used to place your order. I hope this survives after the COVID-19 precautions. It was nice to be able to see what options were available to me rather than having to ask other people. It’s very convenient to be able to place your own order yourself and would be more inclusive for people with hearing and speech difficulties too.

Pub-app

Anxiety adjustment

I don’t know whether I’ve mentioned on this blog that I suffer with anxiety. I’ve mentioned how weird but nice it felt to be out. Last year I felt anxious to be stuck in. It’s like my brain has been reprogrammed. As horrible as COVID-19 has been, the lockdown was freeing in a way because I wasn’t worried about getting anywhere or whether a certain place was accessible. Everywhere was shut and suddenly courses/tours and entertainment were online! Living with my family, surrounded by my belongings and my bedroom and bathroom adapted to my needs I no longer had to physically struggle.

Now that I’ve started going out again my old worries are coming back. The flip side to this is that seeing people and being proactive is healing the parts of me that really struggled being in lockdown. I’m a people person, even with anxiety. No situation is without its positives and negatives. I try to be as positive as possible and to organise myself so that my reasons for anxiety are as minimal as possible. Are you feeling anxious about entering the world or even just your street again? I know plenty of people are, even google thinks so…

How do you feel about adjusting to the outside world?

Adapting to study again

At the end of April 2021, I was accepted onto the Academy For Disabled Journalists course. This course started last year and is run by Ability Today. I would have never been able to do this course if it wasn’t for the pandemic as Ability Today is based in London. Moving the course online, the organisers have decided that it will continue to be delivered this way after restrictions have lifted. Another example of keeping things as inclusive as possible. I hope places that have offered online resources continue to do so. I have loved being able to go on virtual tours and experiences. While I miss face-to face-interactions, studying online is also easier in lots of ways. I’m really enjoying the course and I have a press pass. Look out world, (when restrictions are over, obviously!) At the end of the ADJ, I receive a Certificate in Foundation Journalism.

Press Photo

I’m going to be learning skills and knowledge to get me closer to my dream of being a travel writer. Although I’m really looking forward to the video unit. If you suddenly notice a change in my content then this course is probably why. Writing is still my go-to though I don’t think that will ever change.

Since I started writing this post I’ve received confirmation that I have my care package fully funded! I’ll write more details about it later on but it didn’t seem right not to mention it as I’ve used this blog as my catharsis surrounding my care struggles. The only way is up says Yazz and I happen to agree. Until next time.

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